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New St. Charles Hotel, No. 215 St. Charles street. One square from Canal street. 465 rooms. Elevators. American plan: $3.50 and up. European plan: Rooms $1.50 and up.

THE St. Charles has been numbered among the world's noted hostelries for almost one hundred years. New Orleans boasted of its St. Charles Hotel as early as 1834, and with good reason, for at that time there was probably not its equal anywhere on the American continent.

Replete with historic interest, it has housed many of the most famous men of the century, and its corridors contain to-day many pictures of men and events that bring to mind the stirring times of old New Orleans. Charles Dickens made the St. Charles his stopping place while on his celebrated tour of America.

Oakey Hall, Mayor of New York City during the epoch of its greatest prosperity, visiting New Orleans in '54, said of the St. Charles: "Set the St. Charles down in St. Petersburg and you would think it a palace; in Boston, and ten to one you would christen it a college; in London, and it would marvelously remind you of an Exchange; in New Orleans it is all three." Nor was Oakev Hall the only visitor who broke out into such warm, enthusiastic and rapturous admiration of the St. Charles. Lady Wortley, an English lady, who had "done" Europe thoroughly, and was in search of something new and startling in America, pronounced the St. Charles a superb edifice, very similar to St. Peter's at Rome, and praised its "immense dome and Corinthian portico" as the finest piece of architecture she had ever seen anvwhere in the world.

The present magnificent structure, occupying almost an entire city block square, is the third Hotel St. Charles to occupy the same site. Correct and modern in all its appointments, it furnishes accommodation for twelve hundred guests, while the Convention Halls, Banquet Rooms and other public Assembly Rooms provide ample entertainment space for many hundreds more.

A complete Turkish and Russian Bath Establishment is one of the up-to-date features of the present Hotel and is furnished with the most modern of hydropathic equipment. Every department is in charge of an expert in his line.

The Vice-President and General Manager of the present operating company, Alfred S. Amer, is well and favorably known to the travelling public, and is a graduate of what is known as the Boldt school, having been for many years connected with the management of the Waldorf-Astoria in New York before coming to New Orleans.

The Italian Garden which has been one of the features of the St. Charles has been entirely remodeled and enlarged as to seating capacity and now is capable of acconnnodating 1200 persons. It is situated on the second floor between the Music Room and the Empire Parlors and covers a space, together with its outdoor dining terrace, of over 5.OOO scjuare feet, it is used for Afternoon Tea, and other large functions.

THE St. Charles is especially well equipped to accommodate the many large conventions, and meet ngs of public men attracted to New Orleans by reason of its climatic, geographic and railroad superiority, and it is no unusual occurrence to house from 500 to 1,200 people and provide them with necessary meeting halls, committee rooms, etc. Among the notable gatherings might be mentioned, American Bankers Association, Cotton Conference of Southern Governors, Western Fruit Jobbers Association, American Bottlers Association, National Hardware Manufacturers' Association, Southern Hardware Jobbers Association, National Railway Mail Association and United Typothetae of America.

Fishing and hunting parties find ample accommodations at our hotel and club which is steam heated and electric lighted and a delightful place for the New Orleans visitor to spend a week-end. Oysters food served daily direct from the Gulf. Excellent hunting and fishing. Hotel rates reasonable. See this wonderful property and enjoy a few days outing.

The St. Charles Hotel, the third to bear this historic name on the same site, has always been closely connected with Carnival tradition. Here gather the loyal Dukes of the Realm before proceeding in their carriages to the Royal Pier to welcome Rex on the arrival of the Royal Yacht and escort him in state to the City Hall.

All Parades pass in front of the St. Charles Hotel, where guests may view them from the terrace.

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New Orleans History
1897-1917


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