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Main
Historical Guide Book
to New Orleans
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Antiquity! the olden time! the hoary, venerable past! there is something sacred and soul subduing in the very sound of the words. Like the dying echo of the last tones of the departed, it is full of hallowed memories, and cherished associations, that haunt the inner chambers of the imagination, and linger with a mournful tenderness about the better feelings of the heart.

But what have we to do with Antiquity! They of the old World, who were grey with time and tottering with decay when, but yesterday, they saw us spring into being, laugh at our sometime boast of Antiquity; and well they may, for it is hardly as well substantiated as that of the simple boy who conceived himself the oldest person in the world, because he could not remember when he was born. Yet even we, in the New World, we, of its second or third generation, whose fathers were present at its birth and baptism, even we begin to talk gravely of the olden time, and to sigh and look sad over the melancholy grandeur of the past!

Norman's New Orleans and Environs,
B. M. Norman, 1845
The People
Customs & Superstitions
Lafcadio Hearn
The City
Poem
Picayune's Guide 1904
  Vendors-Customs
  Names & Numbers
  Congo & Voodoo
Hotels & Restaurants
Rooms
Houses
Points of Interest
Poem
Trolley Rides & Tours
Religion
Cemeteries
Commerce
Businesses & Shops
Theatre
Mardi Gras
of His Majesty
1874
Government
References & Sources

My Original Storyville