Canal Street, New Orleans

The Great Boulevard

Canal Street is a great boulevard, and at night one of the best lighted streets in America. A row of electric light poles, not too high, are placed through its centre, while the electric lights from the store fronts are prevented by the wide balconies from throwing their rays above and are concentrated below. Canal Street is about one hundred and twenty feet from curb to curb, and flanked by broad stone sidewalks. It is the objective and starting point for all horse-car lines, and from it one can take the cars for Chicago, Cincinnati, Washington or New York.

Gallery

1861

Canal Street

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1866

Canal Street

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Fountain

Canal Street

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After 1883

Canal Street

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Middle Ground

Canal Street

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1890

Canal Street

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1895

Canal Street

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1900-1910

Canal Street

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1900

Canal Street

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Mardi Gras 1900

Canal Street

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1904

Canal Street

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1904

Canal Street

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1905

Canal Street

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1908

Canal Street

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1910

Canal Street

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1915

Canal Street

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Along the Sunset Route

1915

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1920s

Canal Street

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1922

Canal Street

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1930s

Canal Street

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1940s

Canal Street

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1942

Canal Street

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Late '40s - Early '50s

Canal Street

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Mardi Gras

1950s

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1950s

Canal Street

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1950s

Canal Street

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27-Nov-1953

Canal Street

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20-July 1954

Canal, StCharles, Royal

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1956

Foot of Canal Street

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10-July-1956

Canal Street

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10-July-1956

Canal Street

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1957

Canal Street

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1960

Canal Street

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1960

Canal Street

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1960

Canal-StCharles

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1961

Canal Street

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July, 1961

Canal Street

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August, 1963

Canal Street

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31-Jan-1964

Canal Street

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1-Feb-1964

Canal Street

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1-Feb-1964

Canal Street

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May, 1964

Canal Street

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1970s

Canal Street

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July, 1985

Canal Street

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6-Aug-2003

Canal Street

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Audubon Building

Canal Street

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'A Streetcar Named Desire'

New Orleans

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Its stores are richly laden with goods, and its windows display choice French importations of dress fabrics, kid gloves and fancy articles. Other windows have tempting exhibits of choice French candies and elegant displays of boned turkey hid in crystal jellies, together with other appetizing dishes of the French restaurant. The signs of the drug stores are: "Pharniacie Francaise," or "Botica Espanola." Upon the pavements are flower women in attitudes like those of ancient Rome, surrounded with huge boquets of roses and chrysanthemums, in combinations peculiar to New Orleans. Here sits the old turbaned negress, brushing with peacock feathers the flies that gather over her sweetmeats while she laughingly mutters French at the fezed Turk as he passes by in his flowing robes.

Richly attired ladies and children meet nimble Chinese: Boston and New York young men; copper colored Choctaws ; black-eyed Creoles with fine forms and well fitting costumes; Spanish Creoles in mourning, whole families, the children in deepest black with the whitest of stockings; bronzed Mexican greasers, with dull eyes, few hairs upon their chins, and covered with the queer sombrero; Mexican military officers wearing eye glasses; Mexican soldiers with ill fitting garments; British sailors in slouchy corduroys; French sailors better dressed; Mississippi stevedores with cotton-hooks hanging from their belts; the black plantation hand with bulging eye-balls and clothes shining with cane juice. All these may be seen any pleasant day; but Canal Street is broad, broad enough for all this queer conglomerate medley of people of such diverse individualities.

During the carnival season, the store fronts above the awnings have tiers of seats from whence thousands of spectators view the processions.

The Clay statue on Canal Street is the centre of gravity for all crowds and open air meetings. Henry Clay stands there with outstretched arm, which, to the angry crowds of labor strikers or excited political gatherings, is a presence of peace and moderation. It is said that a portion of the inscription on the base was partially obliterated during the rebellion; but on the other hand it is denied that any obliteration has taken place other than the action of the elements.