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The young French colony of New Orleans attracted many of the foremost families of France, and they brought with them thousands of articles of art, virtu and embellishment of the nobles and their followers, who sought fame and additional riches in the land of the Mexican Gulf.

Hundreds of families cherished their treasures as the only thing remaining to tell of the days when La Belle France had been their home, and to their children they bequeathed the gentle reminders of bygone days, with the injunction to keep them forever. But time removed the cherished traditions which, together with the growing needs of the owners and the wheels of fortune changing continually, brought a large number of these treasures into the hands of second-hand dealers and the showcases of the collectors of antiques.

It is in the quaint old French portion of the city that the newcomer naturally seeks the shops of the dealers in odd things, and it is here that they are found. Not numerous, the supply being small and the antiques real, for there is no factory making New Orleans antiques. These shops may be found in Royal, Bourbon and Chartres streets, in the vicinity of Canal street.

Hawkins, No. 224 Royal street

Schmidt, No. 218 Royal street

Waldhorn, No. 837 Royal street

To the visitor the French Quarter is naturally the most interesting. The old quarter is bounded by the river. Canal and Rampart Streets, and Esplanade Avenue, and here are to be found the quaint and massive old French and Spanish houses, the wide, paved courtyards with tropical vegetation and dowers, the antique stores, famous restaurants, quaint shops possessed by quaint people, nearly all speaking the French language in preference to English.

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New Orleans History, 1897-1917


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